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HP’s Web-Connected Printer Could Be a Game-Changer


In a move that could rock the printing world and set Amazon’s Kindle e-reader on its ear, HP announced on Tuesday an all-in-one printer that can connect directly to the Internet. The device, the HP Photosmart Premium, will let users download content and make purchases from the Internet. Partners for content on delivery include USA Today; Google; and Fandango. HP also announced the HP Apps Studio, from which users will be able to download apps and content on the Photosmart Premium.

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Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on HP’s Web-Connected Printer Could Be a Game-Changer

Kindle, Zune DRM Restrictions Coming Into Focus

It’s not news that the media you buy for both Kindle and Zune are protected by DRM. Readers are sending in stories of some of the ramifications of that fact. First, Absentminded-Artist notes an account at Gear Diary recounting what an Amazon rep told one user about download limits on Kindle books. “One facet of the Kindle’s DRM has reared an ugly head: download limitations. Upgraded your iPhone recently? Bought a new Kindle? You may not be able to reload your entire library. There’s an unadvertised flag: ‘You mean when you go to buy the book it doesn’t say “this book can be downloaded this number of times” even though that limitation is there?’ To which [the rep] replied, ‘No, I’m very sorry it doesn’t.'” Next, reader Rjak writes “DRM is a bad idea, poorly implemented. One of the many many valid reasons to drop Zune and it’s marketplace is the DRM validation error you see below. The vast majority of the music I had purchased last year is completely gone. There’s no refund, the music doesn’t exist on the service anymore, the files are just garbage now. Here’s the error (screen capture): ‘This item is no longer available at Zune Marketplace. Because of this, you can no longer play it or sync it with your Zune. There might be another iteration of it available in Zune Marketplace.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle, Zune DRM Restrictions Coming Into Focus

The Newspaper Isn’t Dead Yet

theodp writes “Slate’s Farhad Manjoo had high hopes for using the Kindle DX — Amazon’s new large-screen e-reader — to read newspapers. A good first effort, says Manjoo, who concludes that for now newsprint still beats the 9 Kindle. While he has issues with latency, what he really misses relates to graphic design. The Kindle presents news as a list, leaving a reader to guess which pieces are most important to read. Newspapers, by contrast, opine on the importance of the day’s news using easy-to-understand design conventions — important stories appear on front pages, with the most important ones going higher on the page and getting more space and bigger headlines. Also, because of its overnight delivery model, Manjoo gripes that the Kindle suffers from a lack of timeliness, making it not even as good as a smartphone.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Newspaper Isn’t Dead Yet

Doctorow Says Google & Amazon Stifle Progress

An anonymous reader writes “Google and Amazon are ‘a danger to everyone involved in the creative industries’ because they act as the intermediary between creators and audiences, says Boing Boing editor Cory Doctorow. He warns that the corporate giants will ‘only fear competition from other established giants … companies whose character as gatekeepers of video distribution and discovery won’t be substantially different.’ The solution, he says, is to use copyrights to lower the cost of entering the market. ‘For so long as copyright holders think like short-timers, seeking a quick buck instead of a healthy competitive marketplace, they’re doomed to work for their gatekeepers,’ he says.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Saturday, June 20th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Doctorow Says Google & Amazon Stifle Progress

Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

narramissic writes “A trifecta of Kindle-related news surfaced this week, with Jeff Bezos speaking at Wired’s ‘Disruptive by Design’ conference on topics including Kindle pricing and business models. And yesterday, reports blogger Peter Smith, ‘there was a flurry of blogging activity yesterday stating that Amazon had released the Kindle source code. Once everyone caught their breath, it became apparent that the files in question were just some open source libraries that Amazon had modified (they’re being good open source citizens and releasing mods they’ve made to open source code — good for them!), not the complete source code.’ Now, back to the Kindle pricing: According to a post at Wired, Bezos said Amazon opted to sell the Kindle for ‘something akin to the actual cost for hardware,’ rather than subsidizing the hardware costs and requiring a monthly subscription or requiring the buyer to purchase a certain number of books per month because ‘fees and minimum purchase requirements create friction.’ Smith has a different take: ‘If I’m buying a Kindle from Amazon that enables me to buy books from Amazon, I’m broadcasting a desire to buy Kindle books. I would welcome some subsidization of the hardware since I’m going to be buying content anyway. No, I really think Amazon priced the Kindle the way they did because they thought they could get away with doing so (and they were right, it would seem).’ Meanwhile, over at the New York Times, Bezos said ‘that he sees Kindle-the-device and Kindle-the-book-format as two separate business models, and that the Kindle iPhone App won’t be the last software reader to appear.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

narramissic writes “A trifecta of Kindle-related news surfaced this week, with Jeff Bezos speaking at Wired’s ‘Disruptive by Design’ conference on topics including Kindle pricing and business models. And yesterday, reports blogger Peter Smith, ‘there was a flurry of blogging activity yesterday stating that Amazon had released the Kindle source code. Once everyone caught their breath, it became apparent that the files in question were just some open source libraries that Amazon had modified (they’re being good open source citizens and releasing mods they’ve made to open source code — good for them!), not the complete source code.’ Now, back to the Kindle pricing: According to a post at Wired, Bezos said Amazon opted to sell the Kindle for ‘something akin to the actual cost for hardware,’ rather than subsidizing the hardware costs and requiring a monthly subscription or requiring the buyer to purchase a certain number of books per month because ‘fees and minimum purchase requirements create friction.’ Smith has a different take: ‘If I’m buying a Kindle from Amazon that enables me to buy books from Amazon, I’m broadcasting a desire to buy Kindle books. I would welcome some subsidization of the hardware since I’m going to be buying content anyway. No, I really think Amazon priced the Kindle the way they did because they thought they could get away with doing so (and they were right, it would seem).’ Meanwhile, over at the New York Times, Bezos said ‘that he sees Kindle-the-device and Kindle-the-book-format as two separate business models, and that the Kindle iPhone App won’t be the last software reader to appear.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

narramissic writes “A trifecta of Kindle-related news surfaced this week, with Jeff Bezos speaking at Wired’s ‘Disruptive by Design’ conference on topics including Kindle pricing and business models. And yesterday, reports blogger Peter Smith, ‘there was a flurry of blogging activity yesterday stating that Amazon had released the Kindle source code. Once everyone caught their breath, it became apparent that the files in question were just some open source libraries that Amazon had modified (they’re being good open source citizens and releasing mods they’ve made to open source code — good for them!), not the complete source code.’ Now, back to the Kindle pricing: According to a post at Wired, Bezos said Amazon opted to sell the Kindle for ‘something akin to the actual cost for hardware,’ rather than subsidizing the hardware costs and requiring a monthly subscription or requiring the buyer to purchase a certain number of books per month because ‘fees and minimum purchase requirements create friction.’ Smith has a different take: ‘If I’m buying a Kindle from Amazon that enables me to buy books from Amazon, I’m broadcasting a desire to buy Kindle books. I would welcome some subsidization of the hardware since I’m going to be buying content anyway. No, I really think Amazon priced the Kindle the way they did because they thought they could get away with doing so (and they were right, it would seem).’ Meanwhile, over at the New York Times, Bezos said ‘that he sees Kindle-the-device and Kindle-the-book-format as two separate business models, and that the Kindle iPhone App won’t be the last software reader to appear.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

Lightning Strikes Amazon’s Cloud (Really)

The Register has details on a recent EC2 outage that is being blamed on a lightning strike that zapped a power distribution unit of the data center. The interruption only lasted around 6 hours, but the irony should last much longer. “While Amazon was correcting the problem, it told customers they had the option of launching new server instances to replace those that went down. But customers were also able to wait for their original instances to come back up after power was restored to the hardware in question.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Saturday, June 13th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Lightning Strikes Amazon’s Cloud (Really)

Lightning zaps Amazon cloud

A lightning strike at one of its data centers this week affected a “very small percentage” of customers, the company said.

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Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Lightning zaps Amazon cloud

UK Gang Caught After $750K Online Music Fraud Scam

LSDelirious writes “10 individuals in the UK have been arrested in connection with an online fraud gang, whereby the group created several songs, had the songs uploaded to iTunes and Amazon, then used thousands of stolen credit cards to repeatedly purchase the songs from these services. It is estimated that they charged approximately 0,000 worth of fraudulent purchases, netting the group over 0,000 in royalties payments.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on UK Gang Caught After $750K Online Music Fraud Scam