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Internet Explorer Fail

I hit ctrl+t in internet explorer 8 and got a javascript error on tabswelcome.htm. First off why is the tabswelcome page running any scripts at all? Why does Internet Explorer suck so much?

Internet Explorer 8 Error On tabswelcome.htm

Internet Explorer 8 Error On tabswelcome.htm

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Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 browsers 2 Comments

Could We Beam Broadband Internet Into Iran?

abenamer writes “Some reporter at a recent White House press briefing just asked the White House press secretary, Robert Gibbs, this question: Was ‘the White House….considering beaming broad capability into Iran via satellite so the opposition forces would be able to communicate with themselves and the outside world?’ ‘Gibbs said he didn’t know such a thing was possible. (Is it?) But he said he would check on the technological feasibility and get back with an answer.’ I’m not sure what the reporter meant by beaming broadband into Iran: Do they even have 3G? Would we bomb the Iranians with SIM cards that would allow them to get text messages from the VOA? Or somehow put up massive Wi-Fi transmitters from Iraq and beam it into Iran? How would you beam broadband into Iran?”

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Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Could We Beam Broadband Internet Into Iran?

Wind Could Provide 100% of World Energy Needs

Damien1972 sends in a report on a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, which finds that wind power could provide for the entire world’s current and future energy needs. “To estimate the earth’s capacity for wind power, the researchers first sectioned the globe into areas of approximately 3,300 square kilometers (2,050 square miles) and surveyed local wind speeds every six hours. They imagined 2.5 megawatt turbines crisscrossing the terrestrial globe, excluding ‘areas classified as forested, areas occupied by permanent snow or ice, areas covered by water, and areas identified as either developed or urban,’ according to the paper. They also included the possibility of 3.6 megawatt offshore wind turbines, but restricted them to 50 nautical miles off the coast and to oceans depths less than 200 meters. Using [these] criteria the researchers found that wind energy could not only supply all of the world’s energy requirements, but it could provide over forty times the world’s current electrical consumption and over five times the global use of total energy needs.”

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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Wind Could Provide 100% of World Energy Needs

ASCAP Wants To Be Paid When Your Phone Rings

gerddie notes a piece up on the EFF site outlining the fairly outlandish legal theories ASCAP is trying out in their court fight with AT&T. “ASCAP (the same folks who went after Girl Scouts for singing around a campfire) appears to believe that every time your musical ringtone rings in public, you’re violating copyright law by ‘publicly performing’ it without a license. At least that’s the import of a brief (PDF, 2.5 MB) it filed in ASCAP’s court battle with mobile phone giant AT&T.”

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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on ASCAP Wants To Be Paid When Your Phone Rings

US Military Blocks Data On Incoming Meteors

Hugh Pickens writes “Nature reports that the US military has abruptly ended an informal arrangement that allowed scientists access to data on incoming meteors from classified surveillance satellites, dealing a blow to the astronomers and planetary scientists who used the information to track space rocks. ‘These systems are extremely useful,’ says astronomer Peter Brown, at the University of Western Ontario. ‘I think the tech community benefited enormously.’ Meteor data came from the Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite network consisting of infrared satellites in geosynchronous orbit to monitor the globe for missile launches or atmospheric nuclear blasts, forming the principal component of the United States’ ballistic missile early-warning system. The satellites’ effectiveness was demonstrated during Desert Storm, when DSP detected the launch of Iraqi Scud missiles and provided warning to civilian populations and coalition forces in Israel and Saudi Arabia. As a side benefit, the satellites could also precisely detect the time, position, altitude and brightness of meteors as they entered Earth’s atmosphere, information the military didn’t consider particularly useful, or classified. ‘It was being dropped on the floor,’ says former Air Force captain Brian Weeden. Although the reason for ending the arrangement remains unclear, Weeden notes that it coincides with the launch of a new generation of surveillance satellites and speculates that the Pentagon may not want details of the new satellites’ capabilities to be made public, or it may simply lack the expensive software needed to handle classified and declassified data simultaneously. ‘The decision may have been made that it was perhaps too difficult to disclose just these data.'”

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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on US Military Blocks Data On Incoming Meteors

Ultra-Thin Laptops To Be Next Intel-AMD Battleground

FinalAnkleHealer sends along an IBTimes article proposing that 0 ultra-thin laptops, capable of multitasking and editing multimedia content, could be the next market contested by Intel and AMD. “AMD partnered with Hewlett-Packard Co. in January to launch the Pavilion dv2. Intel launched its rival CULV (Consumer Ultra Low Voltage) chip this month and Acer Inc. and Asustek Computer Inc were among those that demonstrated laptops based on the new technology at the Computex trade show in Taipei. … With more people gravitating toward mobile and wireless technology, consumers want smaller laptops — and most of those people would prefer doing more than surfing the Web, which the no-frills netbooks now excel at. … Acer, the first company to introduce a cheap Intel-powered CULV laptop, expects revenue from that segment to account for 15 percent of its total sales by the end of 2009. Asustek, which pioneered the netbook in 2007, plans to launch five consumer-priced ultra-thins this year.”

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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Ultra-Thin Laptops To Be Next Intel-AMD Battleground

How the Obama Copyright Policies Might Unfold

An anonymous reader points out a column by James Boyle, who knows a thing or two about copyright, analyzing the Obama Administration’s policy choices about intellectual property and high tech. “Traditionally, Democratic administrations take their copyright policy direct from Hollywood and the recording industry. Unfortunately, so do Republican administrations. The capture of regulators by the industry they regulate is nothing new, of course, but in intellectual property there is the added benefit that incumbents can frequently squelch competing technologies and business methods before they ever come into existence. … The Obama administration’s warm embrace of Silicon Valley, and Silicon Valley’s checkbook, had given some hope that this pattern would change — and I think it will. Now, instead of taking copyright policy direct from the media conglomerates (who, after all, have a very legitimate point of view — even if not the only point of view) it is quite likely that the administration will construct it as a contract between content companies and high-technology companies such as Google. In some places, citizens and consumers will probably benefit, simply because optimizing for the interests of two economic blocs rather than one is likely to give us a slightly more balanced, and less technology-phobic, set of rules. And perhaps the administration will go further. But recent actions make me doubt that this is the case.”

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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on How the Obama Copyright Policies Might Unfold

iPhone 3G S Can Record 720p HD Video, But Doesn’t

Apple has thus far decided not to take advantage of these HD capabilities for video recording, as the iPhone 3G S video camera will only capture clips in VGA-quality.

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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on iPhone 3G S Can Record 720p HD Video, But Doesn’t

Kindle, Zune DRM Restrictions Coming Into Focus

It’s not news that the media you buy for both Kindle and Zune are protected by DRM. Readers are sending in stories of some of the ramifications of that fact. First, Absentminded-Artist notes an account at Gear Diary recounting what an Amazon rep told one user about download limits on Kindle books. “One facet of the Kindle’s DRM has reared an ugly head: download limitations. Upgraded your iPhone recently? Bought a new Kindle? You may not be able to reload your entire library. There’s an unadvertised flag: ‘You mean when you go to buy the book it doesn’t say “this book can be downloaded this number of times” even though that limitation is there?’ To which [the rep] replied, ‘No, I’m very sorry it doesn’t.'” Next, reader Rjak writes “DRM is a bad idea, poorly implemented. One of the many many valid reasons to drop Zune and it’s marketplace is the DRM validation error you see below. The vast majority of the music I had purchased last year is completely gone. There’s no refund, the music doesn’t exist on the service anymore, the files are just garbage now. Here’s the error (screen capture): ‘This item is no longer available at Zune Marketplace. Because of this, you can no longer play it or sync it with your Zune. There might be another iteration of it available in Zune Marketplace.'”

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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle, Zune DRM Restrictions Coming Into Focus

How RIAA Case Should Have Played Out

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes “If a regular ‘country lawyer’ like myself had taken a case like the RIAA’s in Capitol Records v. Thomas-Rasset to court, he or she would have been laughed out of the courthouse. But when it’s the RIAA suing, the plaintiffs are awarded a .92 million verdict for the infringement of .76 worth of song files. That’s because RIAA litigation proceeds in a parallel universe, which on its face looks like litigation, but isn’t. On my blog I fantasize as to how the trial would have ended had it taken place not in the ‘parallel universe,’ but in the real world of litigation. In that world, the case would have been dismissed. And if the Judge had submitted it to the jury instead of dismissing, and the jury had ruled in favor of the RIAA, the ‘statutory damages’ awarded would have been less than ,000.”

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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on How RIAA Case Should Have Played Out