kindle

HP’s Web-Connected Printer Could Be a Game-Changer


In a move that could rock the printing world and set Amazon’s Kindle e-reader on its ear, HP announced on Tuesday an all-in-one printer that can connect directly to the Internet. The device, the HP Photosmart Premium, will let users download content and make purchases from the Internet. Partners for content on delivery include USA Today; Google; and Fandango. HP also announced the HP Apps Studio, from which users will be able to download apps and content on the Photosmart Premium.

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Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on HP’s Web-Connected Printer Could Be a Game-Changer

Kindle, Zune DRM Restrictions Coming Into Focus

It’s not news that the media you buy for both Kindle and Zune are protected by DRM. Readers are sending in stories of some of the ramifications of that fact. First, Absentminded-Artist notes an account at Gear Diary recounting what an Amazon rep told one user about download limits on Kindle books. “One facet of the Kindle’s DRM has reared an ugly head: download limitations. Upgraded your iPhone recently? Bought a new Kindle? You may not be able to reload your entire library. There’s an unadvertised flag: ‘You mean when you go to buy the book it doesn’t say “this book can be downloaded this number of times” even though that limitation is there?’ To which [the rep] replied, ‘No, I’m very sorry it doesn’t.'” Next, reader Rjak writes “DRM is a bad idea, poorly implemented. One of the many many valid reasons to drop Zune and it’s marketplace is the DRM validation error you see below. The vast majority of the music I had purchased last year is completely gone. There’s no refund, the music doesn’t exist on the service anymore, the files are just garbage now. Here’s the error (screen capture): ‘This item is no longer available at Zune Marketplace. Because of this, you can no longer play it or sync it with your Zune. There might be another iteration of it available in Zune Marketplace.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle, Zune DRM Restrictions Coming Into Focus

The Newspaper Isn’t Dead Yet

theodp writes “Slate’s Farhad Manjoo had high hopes for using the Kindle DX — Amazon’s new large-screen e-reader — to read newspapers. A good first effort, says Manjoo, who concludes that for now newsprint still beats the 9 Kindle. While he has issues with latency, what he really misses relates to graphic design. The Kindle presents news as a list, leaving a reader to guess which pieces are most important to read. Newspapers, by contrast, opine on the importance of the day’s news using easy-to-understand design conventions — important stories appear on front pages, with the most important ones going higher on the page and getting more space and bigger headlines. Also, because of its overnight delivery model, Manjoo gripes that the Kindle suffers from a lack of timeliness, making it not even as good as a smartphone.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Newspaper Isn’t Dead Yet

Satellite Glitch Rekindles GPS Concerns

coondoggie writes “News today that the Air Force is investigating signal problems with its latest Global Positioning System satellite is likely to rekindle the flames of a congressional report last month that said the current GPS coverage may not be so ubiquitous in the future. The Air Force stated that routine early orbit checkout procedures determined that the signals from the Lockheed-built GPS IIR-2 (M), which was launched in March, were inconsistent with the performance of other GPS IIR-M satellites. The Air Force said it has identified several parameters in the GPS IIR-20 (M)’s navigation message that can be corrected to bring the satellite into compliance with current GPS Performance Standards.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Thursday, June 18th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Satellite Glitch Rekindles GPS Concerns

Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

narramissic writes “A trifecta of Kindle-related news surfaced this week, with Jeff Bezos speaking at Wired’s ‘Disruptive by Design’ conference on topics including Kindle pricing and business models. And yesterday, reports blogger Peter Smith, ‘there was a flurry of blogging activity yesterday stating that Amazon had released the Kindle source code. Once everyone caught their breath, it became apparent that the files in question were just some open source libraries that Amazon had modified (they’re being good open source citizens and releasing mods they’ve made to open source code — good for them!), not the complete source code.’ Now, back to the Kindle pricing: According to a post at Wired, Bezos said Amazon opted to sell the Kindle for ‘something akin to the actual cost for hardware,’ rather than subsidizing the hardware costs and requiring a monthly subscription or requiring the buyer to purchase a certain number of books per month because ‘fees and minimum purchase requirements create friction.’ Smith has a different take: ‘If I’m buying a Kindle from Amazon that enables me to buy books from Amazon, I’m broadcasting a desire to buy Kindle books. I would welcome some subsidization of the hardware since I’m going to be buying content anyway. No, I really think Amazon priced the Kindle the way they did because they thought they could get away with doing so (and they were right, it would seem).’ Meanwhile, over at the New York Times, Bezos said ‘that he sees Kindle-the-device and Kindle-the-book-format as two separate business models, and that the Kindle iPhone App won’t be the last software reader to appear.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

narramissic writes “A trifecta of Kindle-related news surfaced this week, with Jeff Bezos speaking at Wired’s ‘Disruptive by Design’ conference on topics including Kindle pricing and business models. And yesterday, reports blogger Peter Smith, ‘there was a flurry of blogging activity yesterday stating that Amazon had released the Kindle source code. Once everyone caught their breath, it became apparent that the files in question were just some open source libraries that Amazon had modified (they’re being good open source citizens and releasing mods they’ve made to open source code — good for them!), not the complete source code.’ Now, back to the Kindle pricing: According to a post at Wired, Bezos said Amazon opted to sell the Kindle for ‘something akin to the actual cost for hardware,’ rather than subsidizing the hardware costs and requiring a monthly subscription or requiring the buyer to purchase a certain number of books per month because ‘fees and minimum purchase requirements create friction.’ Smith has a different take: ‘If I’m buying a Kindle from Amazon that enables me to buy books from Amazon, I’m broadcasting a desire to buy Kindle books. I would welcome some subsidization of the hardware since I’m going to be buying content anyway. No, I really think Amazon priced the Kindle the way they did because they thought they could get away with doing so (and they were right, it would seem).’ Meanwhile, over at the New York Times, Bezos said ‘that he sees Kindle-the-device and Kindle-the-book-format as two separate business models, and that the Kindle iPhone App won’t be the last software reader to appear.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

narramissic writes “A trifecta of Kindle-related news surfaced this week, with Jeff Bezos speaking at Wired’s ‘Disruptive by Design’ conference on topics including Kindle pricing and business models. And yesterday, reports blogger Peter Smith, ‘there was a flurry of blogging activity yesterday stating that Amazon had released the Kindle source code. Once everyone caught their breath, it became apparent that the files in question were just some open source libraries that Amazon had modified (they’re being good open source citizens and releasing mods they’ve made to open source code — good for them!), not the complete source code.’ Now, back to the Kindle pricing: According to a post at Wired, Bezos said Amazon opted to sell the Kindle for ‘something akin to the actual cost for hardware,’ rather than subsidizing the hardware costs and requiring a monthly subscription or requiring the buyer to purchase a certain number of books per month because ‘fees and minimum purchase requirements create friction.’ Smith has a different take: ‘If I’m buying a Kindle from Amazon that enables me to buy books from Amazon, I’m broadcasting a desire to buy Kindle books. I would welcome some subsidization of the hardware since I’m going to be buying content anyway. No, I really think Amazon priced the Kindle the way they did because they thought they could get away with doing so (and they were right, it would seem).’ Meanwhile, over at the New York Times, Bezos said ‘that he sees Kindle-the-device and Kindle-the-book-format as two separate business models, and that the Kindle iPhone App won’t be the last software reader to appear.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Kindle Pricing, Business Models and Source Code

Wolfram Alpha Rekindles Campus Math Tool Debate

An anonymous reader sends in a story about how Wolfram Alpha is becoming the latest tool students are using to help with their schoolwork, and why some professors are worried it will interfere with the learning process. Quoting: “The goal of WolframAlpha is to bring high-level mathematics to the masses, by letting users type in problems in plain English and delivering instant results. As a result, some professors say the service poses tough questions for their classroom policies. ‘I think this is going to reignite a math war,’ said Maria H. Andersen, a mathematics instructor at Muskegon Community College, referring to past debates over the role of graphing calculators in math education. ‘Given that there are still pockets of instructors and departments in the US where graphing calculators are still not allowed, some instructors will likely react with resistance (i.e. we still don’t change anything) or possibly even with the charge that using WA is cheating.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Wolfram Alpha Rekindles Campus Math Tool Debate

The Rise and Fall of Traditional Journalism, Part 4


Ask someone about the future of journalism, and it’s likely that most people will point to something like E-Ink or perhaps the Amazon Kindle — high-fidelity readers that use millions of embedded, magnetically sensitive spheres which can show a black, white or in-between state to create dynamically refreshing text content. Such readers no doubt have a great deal of potential, but while it’s entirely possible that future newspapers will be displayed on such readers, they will also be displayed on laptops and netbooks, on cellphones, and on car heads-up displays.

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Monday, June 8th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Rise and Fall of Traditional Journalism, Part 4

The Rise and Fall of Traditional Journalism, Part 4


Ask someone about the future of journalism, and it’s likely that most people will point to something like E-Ink or perhaps the Amazon Kindle — high-fidelity readers that use millions of embedded, magnetically sensitive spheres which can show a black, white or in-between state to create dynamically refreshing text content. Such readers no doubt have a great deal of potential, but while it’s entirely possible that future newspapers will be displayed on such readers, they will also be displayed on laptops and netbooks, on cellphones, and on car heads-up displays.

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Monday, June 8th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Rise and Fall of Traditional Journalism, Part 4