malware

Nine Ball attack strikes 40,000 Web sites

More than 40,000 Web sites have been hit by a mass-compromise attack dubbed Nine Ball that injects malware into pages and redirects victims to a site that will then try to download Trojans and keylogger code, Websense said today.

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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Nine Ball attack strikes 40,000 Web sites

Nine Ball attack strikes 40,000 Web sites

More than 40,000 Web sites have been hit by a mass-compromise attack dubbed Nine Ball that injects malware into pages and redirects victims to a site that will then try to download Trojans and keylogger code, Websense said today.

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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Nine Ball attack strikes 40,000 Web sites

The Next Ad You Click May Be a Virus

Jay notes a Wall Street Journal report about ad networks unintentionally selling empty space to malware loaders (the link is to a syndicating site that doesn’t require a subscription to view). The submitter comments: “The labeling of the fake ad sellers as hackers is pretty bogus; there’s no hacking involved. Simply sign up for one of these networks, create your fake site, put up another company’s creative, and you’re good to go.” The incidents being reported go back a few months, but the pattern of this criminal activity seems to be coming clear only recently.”EWeek.com, a technology news site owned by Ziff Davis Enterprise, in February displayed an ad on its homepage masquerading as a promotion for LaCoste, the shirt maker. The retailer hadn’t placed the ad — a hacker had, to direct users to a Web site where harmful programs would be downloaded to their computers, says Stephen Wellman, director of community and content for Ziff Davis.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Monday, June 15th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Next Ad You Click May Be a Virus

The Next Ad You Click May Be a Virus

Jay notes a Wall Street Journal report about ad networks unintentionally selling empty space to malware loaders (the link is to a syndicating site that doesn’t require a subscription to view). The submitter comments: “The labeling of the fake ad sellers as hackers is pretty bogus; there’s no hacking involved. Simply sign up for one of these networks, create your fake site, put up another company’s creative, and you’re good to go.” The incidents being reported go back a few months, but the pattern of this criminal activity seems to be coming clear only recently.”EWeek.com, a technology news site owned by Ziff Davis Enterprise, in February displayed an ad on its homepage masquerading as a promotion for LaCoste, the shirt maker. The retailer hadn’t placed the ad — a hacker had, to direct users to a Web site where harmful programs would be downloaded to their computers, says Stephen Wellman, director of community and content for Ziff Davis.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Monday, June 15th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Next Ad You Click May Be a Virus

The Next Ad You Click May Be a Virus

Jay notes a Wall Street Journal report about ad networks unintentionally selling empty space to malware loaders (the link is to a syndicating site that doesn’t require a subscription to view). The submitter comments: “The labeling of the fake ad sellers as hackers is pretty bogus; there’s no hacking involved. Simply sign up for one of these networks, create your fake site, put up another company’s creative, and you’re good to go.” The incidents being reported go back a few months, but the pattern of this criminal activity seems to be coming clear only recently.”EWeek.com, a technology news site owned by Ziff Davis Enterprise, in February displayed an ad on its homepage masquerading as a promotion for LaCoste, the shirt maker. The retailer hadn’t placed the ad — a hacker had, to direct users to a Web site where harmful programs would be downloaded to their computers, says Stephen Wellman, director of community and content for Ziff Davis.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Monday, June 15th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Next Ad You Click May Be a Virus

Microsoft’s Free AV App May Be a Non-Starter

CWmike writes “M|cr0s0ft is preparing to launch a public beta of Morro, the free anti-malware it announced last November, according to reports. Morro will use the same scanning engine as Windows Live OneCare, the software that the free software will replace and M|cr0s0ft’s first consumer-grade antivirus package. OneCare is to get the boot as of June 30 (along with finance app M|cr0s0ft Money). John Pescatore, an analyst at Gartner, has questioned whether users would step up to Morro even if it was free. ‘Consumers are hesitant to pay for a M|cr0s0ft security product that will remove problems in other M|cr0s0ft products,’ he said. ‘Think of it this way. What if you smelled a rotten egg odor in your water and the water company said, “Sure, we can remove that, but it will cost you .” Would you buy it?’ Not surprisingly, competitors have dismissed Morro’s threat to their business. ‘We like our chances,’ Todd Gebhart, vice president in charge of McAfee’s consumer line, said when it was announced OneCare was a goner. ‘Consumers have already rejected OneCare,’ added Rowan Trollope, senior vice president of consumer software at Symantec. ‘Making that same substandard security technology free won’t change that equation.'”

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Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Microsoft’s Free AV App May Be a Non-Starter

New Denial-of-Service Attacks Threaten Wireless Data Networks

alphadogg writes “Forget spam, viruses, worms, malware and phishing. These threats are apparently old school when compared to a new class of denial-of-service (DOS) attacks that threaten wireless data networks. The threats were outlined in a talk in NYC Thursday by Krishan Sabnani, vice president of networking research at Bell Labs, at the Cyber Infrastructure Protection Conference at City College of New York. Sabnani said they are the result of inherent weaknesses in Mobile IP, a protocol that uses tunneling and complex network triangulation to allow mobile devices to move freely from one network to another. ‘We need to especially monitor the mobile networks — with limited bandwidth and terminal battery — for DOS attacks,’ Sabnani said, adding that the newest DOS attacks on wireless networks involve repeatedly establishing and releasing connections. These attacks are easy to launch and hard to detect, he said.”

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Saturday, June 6th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on New Denial-of-Service Attacks Threaten Wireless Data Networks

Cybercriminals Refine ATM Data-sniffing Software

BobB-nw writes “Cybercriminals are improving a malicious software program that can be installed on ATMs running M|cr0s0ft’s Windows XP operating system that records sensitive card details, according to security vendor Trustwave. The malware has been found so far on ATMs in Eastern European countries, according to a Trustwave report. The malware records the magnetic stripe information on the back of a card as well as the PIN, which would potentially allow criminals to clone the card in order to withdraw cash. The collected card data, which is encrypted using the DES algorithm, can be printed out by the ATM’s receipt printer, Trustwave wrote.”

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Thursday, June 4th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Cybercriminals Refine ATM Data-sniffing Software

40,000 sites hit by PC-pwning hack attack

More than 40,000 websites worldwide have fallen under the spell of a sneaky piece of attack code that silently tries to install malware on the machines of people who visit them, security experts from Websense have warned.The mass attack has been dubbed Beladen because beladen.net is one of the internet domains used to unleash a swarm of exploits

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Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on 40,000 sites hit by PC-pwning hack attack

The Most Dangerous Words to Search For Online

“Screensavers” has the top risk at 59.1 percent, according to McAfee’s recently released PDF report, “The Web’s Most Dangerous Search Terms”. The study looked at 2,658 unique popular key phrases across 413,368 unique URLs, to find those searches that more often exposed users malware and fraudulent web sites.

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Friday, May 29th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The Most Dangerous Words to Search For Online