network

UK Gets Europe’s First 3G Femtocell

judgecorp writes “Femtocells have been on the horizon for a while, but the UK just got the first 3G femtocell launch in Europe, by Vodafone. The device connects to handsets in the room and links them to the cellular network over broadband. It’s a classic win-win, because it gives the user better coverage and takes traffic off the service provider’s network. The only complaint might be from the broadband provider, who could be carrying traffic for a rival. Vodafone isn’t pushing the data angle, but since it has HSPA, the product could work just fine with laptops and dongles. Femtos have been in limbo waiting for serious launches, but judging from the list of speakers at the World Femtocell Summit in London, Vodafone might not be the only one.

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Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on UK Gets Europe’s First 3G Femtocell

Why You Need a Network Analyzer

In today’s world, it seems that more of the people I run across do not feel they need — or, more accurately, don’t understand why they need — a protocol analyzer for their network. A few years ago, it seemed that more people understood just how important the analyzer was. For some reason, as networks have become smarter and much more complex, this understanding seems to have dissipated. I am not sure whether it is due to the proliferation of network tools or the belief that a network can “heal” itself. Trust me, it can’t.

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Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Why You Need a Network Analyzer

Record Labels Target More Irish ISPs for “Three-Strikes”

The music industry, led by the Irish Recorded Music Association (IRMA), is suing two Irish ISPs, BT Ireland and UPC Ireland, to make them take action against illegal file-sharers on their networks.

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Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Record Labels Target More Irish ISPs for “Three-Strikes”

Boingo Awarded a Patent For Hotspot Access

Boingo has scored a patent for accessing a Wi-Fi hotspot by a mobile device. The patent, no. 7,483,984, was issued in January, but Boingo only started talking about it recently. The patent application was filed in December 2002. According to the company, the methods covered by the patent include: “…accessing wireless carrier networks by mobile computing devices, where a client software application hosted by the device accesses carrier networks using wireless access points. For example, when a computer — or netbook, smartphone or any other Wi-Fi-enabled device — is in a location where there are multiple signals, the patented technology looks at each signal and alerts the user which signal will work, showing the signal as an understandable name and ID for the user.The patent covers all wireless technologies and spectrums, as well as any mobile device that access wireless hotspots.” The company is not saying anything about whether or how they will attempt to wield this patent.

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Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Boingo Awarded a Patent For Hotspot Access

Minn. Supreme Court Upholds City’s Right To Build Own Network

BcNexus writes with news from Minnesota that may have significance for cities around the US where municipal networks are either in place or planned: “Here’s the latest development in a fight pitting a telecommunication company against government competition. The telco, TDS, took its fight all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court because it thought the city had no right to serve people’s internet, voice and television needs with its own network, but has failed.” Also from Minnesota today, BcNexus writes “The State of Minnesota was the first to blink and chose to avoid a court showdown when it dropped its attempt to block online gambling sites.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Minn. Supreme Court Upholds City’s Right To Build Own Network

Crowdsourcing Big Brother In Lancaster, PA

sehlat writes “From the Los Angeles Times comes word that in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 165 public surveillance cameras are being set up to be monitored by a ‘non profit coalition’ of volunteers. The usual suspects, including ‘the innocent have nothing to fear’ are being trotted out to justify this, and the following quote at the end of the article deserves mention: ‘But Jack Bauer, owner of the city’s largest beer and soft drink distributor, calls the network “a great thing.” His store hasn’t been robbed, he said, since four cameras went up nearby. “There’s nothing wrong with instilling fear,” he said.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Crowdsourcing Big Brother In Lancaster, PA

US Military Blocks Data On Incoming Meteors

Hugh Pickens writes “Nature reports that the US military has abruptly ended an informal arrangement that allowed scientists access to data on incoming meteors from classified surveillance satellites, dealing a blow to the astronomers and planetary scientists who used the information to track space rocks. ‘These systems are extremely useful,’ says astronomer Peter Brown, at the University of Western Ontario. ‘I think the tech community benefited enormously.’ Meteor data came from the Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite network consisting of infrared satellites in geosynchronous orbit to monitor the globe for missile launches or atmospheric nuclear blasts, forming the principal component of the United States’ ballistic missile early-warning system. The satellites’ effectiveness was demonstrated during Desert Storm, when DSP detected the launch of Iraqi Scud missiles and provided warning to civilian populations and coalition forces in Israel and Saudi Arabia. As a side benefit, the satellites could also precisely detect the time, position, altitude and brightness of meteors as they entered Earth’s atmosphere, information the military didn’t consider particularly useful, or classified. ‘It was being dropped on the floor,’ says former Air Force captain Brian Weeden. Although the reason for ending the arrangement remains unclear, Weeden notes that it coincides with the launch of a new generation of surveillance satellites and speculates that the Pentagon may not want details of the new satellites’ capabilities to be made public, or it may simply lack the expensive software needed to handle classified and declassified data simultaneously. ‘The decision may have been made that it was perhaps too difficult to disclose just these data.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on US Military Blocks Data On Incoming Meteors

More BitTorrent Users Go Anonymous

Users of BitTorrent and other file-sharing networks are increasingly seeking solutions to hide their identities from the outside world. With pressure from anti-piracy outfits mounting on ISPs to police their networks and warn those who share copyrighted content, many file-sharers have decided to negate this by going anonymous.

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Monday, June 22nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on More BitTorrent Users Go Anonymous

Terrorists’ Newest Weapon: Hacktivism


Terrorist groups that have long used the Internet to spread propaganda are increasingly tapping the Web to teach Islamic extremists how to be hackers, recruit techies for cyberwarfare and raise money through online fraud, U.S. officials say. A senior defense official said intelligence reports indicate extremist groups are seeking computer experts, including those capable of breaching government or other sensitive network systems. The official said the extent and success of those recruiting efforts are unclear.

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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Terrorists’ Newest Weapon: Hacktivism

Best Handset For Freedom?

Father Thomas Dowd writes “The pictures we are seeing of Iran are being captured on cell phones and the text is being twittered over SMS. Still, the government has some control over the networks, and we are all familiar with fears of wiretap technologies to spy on users. If the cell phone is the new tool of freedom, what would the best ‘freedom handset’ contain? I’m thinking of a device with an open OS, where each phone could be a router for encrypted messages passed through Bluetooth/WiFi/whatever, thereby totally bypassing physical infrastructures when necessary. Of course, some sort of plausible deniability encryption a la Truecrypt would also be good, in case the secret police catch you with your phone. What else might we need?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Best Handset For Freedom?