privacy

Norwegian Lawyers Must Stop Chasing File Sharers

Skapare sends word from TorrentFreak that Norway’s Simonsen law firm has lost their license to pursue file sharers. “Just days after Norway’s data protection department told ISPs they must delete all personal IP address-related data three weeks after collection, it’s now become safer than ever to be a file-sharer in Norway. The only law firm with a license to track pirates has just seen it expire and it won’t be renewed.” Skapare adds, “Sounds like Norway’s government treats privacy seriously. Maybe they’ve been watching the abuses in the USA. More info on the Norwegian perspective in this Google translation from Dagbladet.no.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , ,

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Norwegian Lawyers Must Stop Chasing File Sharers

DHS To Kill Domestic Satellite Spying Program

mcgrew writes “The Bush administration had plans in place to use spy satellites to spy on American citizens. This morning the AP reports that new DHS head Janet Napolitano has axed those plans. ‘The program was announced in 2007 and was to have the Homeland Security Department use overhead and mapping imagery from existing satellites for homeland security and law enforcement purposes. The program, called the National Applications Office, has been delayed because of privacy and civil liberty concerns. The program was included in the Obama administration’s 2010 budget request, according to Rep. Jane Harman, a California Democrat and House homeland security committee member who was briefed on the department’s classified intelligence budget.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , , , , ,

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on DHS To Kill Domestic Satellite Spying Program

Facebook Taps Privacy Hawk as Lobbyist

Facebook’s newly minted lobbyist used to be one of the company’s most formidable adversaries. Now the former ACLU counsel is working to build the tech firm’s beltway clout.

Share

Tags: , ,

Sunday, June 21st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Facebook Taps Privacy Hawk as Lobbyist

Microsoft Launches New "Get the Facts" Campaign

ko9 writes that M|cr0s0ft has re-launched its “‘Get the facts’ campaign, in an attempt to promote Internet Explorer 8. It contains a chart that compares IE8 to Firefox and Chrome. Needless to say, IE8 comes out as the clear winner, with MS suggesting it is the only browser to provide features like ‘privacy,’ ‘security,’ ‘reliability.’ It even claims to have Firefox beat in ‘customizability.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , , ,

Friday, June 19th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Microsoft Launches New "Get the Facts" Campaign

Swedish Court Says IP Numbers Privacy Protected

oh2 writes “The highest applicable Swedish court, Regeringsrätten, has ruled that IP numbers are protected (in Swedish) since they can be traced to individuals. This means that only government agencies are allowed to track and store IP adresses, leaving “anti-piracy” advocates with no legal way to find possible copyright infringers.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: ,

Thursday, June 18th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Swedish Court Says IP Numbers Privacy Protected

British Court Rules Against Blogger Anonymity

An anonymous reader writes “In a dangerous judgment for British bloggers and whistleblowers, a British court has ruled (absurdly) that because blogging itself is a public activity, bloggers have ‘no reasonable expectation of privacy’ regarding their identities, and newspapers are allowed to publish their identities if they can find them by fair or foul means. A British police detective who recently won the Orwell Prize for his excellent political writing used his blog to write highly critical accounts of police activities and unethical behavior, making very powerful enemies in the process. A well-funded newspaper with powerful connections quickly heard of his blog and decided it was absolutely vital to expose his identity using an investigative journalist. Like any good newspaper, the blogger anonymized the people and the locations in all the cases he discussed on his blog, but the newspaper alleges these were not sufficiently anonymized and complains that they could work out the identities, though British newspapers don’t complain that they are allowed to publish the identities of men who are falsely accused of rape and cleared in court. The newspaper also helpfully contacted the blogger’s employer, and his job is now threatened.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: ,

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on British Court Rules Against Blogger Anonymity

Anonymous Newspaper Commenters Subpoenaed In Tax Case

skuzzlebutt writes “In a federal tax case reported in the Las Vegas Review Journal last week, a local businessman has been paying his employees in gold coins instead of cash or ACH, and has reportedly told them that they can only be taxed on the face value of the coinage — not the much higher market value of the metal. The United States disagreed, and brought him up on 57 counts of income tax evasion, tax fraud and criminal conspiracy. The non-authenticated comments section of the original article brought a lot of supporters out of the woodwork, including a few who thought the jury should be hung (literally, procedurally, or figuratively … pick one). In response, the prosecution has subpoenaed the names of the anonymous commenters, citing fears of jury safety. Or something. The obvious questions of privacy and protected speech aside, for the folks that support the defendant (the newspaper is fighting the subpoena), this also brings back into the spotlight the troll-empowering nature of pseudo-anonymous, non-authenticated boards. If they want to find you, they will; is anonymous commenting still worth it, or is it just too risky for the board owners?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: ,

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Anonymous Newspaper Commenters Subpoenaed In Tax Case

Anonymous Newspaper Commenters Subpoenaed In Tax Case

skuzzlebutt writes “In a federal tax case reported in the Las Vegas Review Journal last week, a local businessman has been paying his employees in gold coins instead of cash or ACH, and has reportedly told them that they can only be taxed on the face value of the coinage — not the much higher market value of the metal. The United States disagreed, and brought him up on 57 counts of income tax evasion, tax fraud and criminal conspiracy. The non-authenticated comments section of the original article brought a lot of supporters out of the woodwork, including a few who thought the jury should be hung (literally, procedurally, or figuratively … pick one). In response, the prosecution has subpoenaed the names of the anonymous commenters, citing fears of jury safety. Or something. The obvious questions of privacy and protected speech aside, for the folks that support the defendant (the newspaper is fighting the subpoena), this also brings back into the spotlight the troll-empowering nature of pseudo-anonymous, non-authenticated boards. If they want to find you, they will; is anonymous commenting still worth it, or is it just too risky for the board owners?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: ,

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Anonymous Newspaper Commenters Subpoenaed In Tax Case

Neutralizing the Smartphone Security Threat


There are many common, but inaccurate, assumptions about the security and privacy of smartphones and other handheld converged devices. For many corporate employees today, mobile phones and PDAs have replaced PCs. Enterprise workers are now performing the same functions they previously carried out on their desktop PCs on much smaller devices, virtually anywhere and anytime. One of the hidden dangers most CSOs and CIOs aren’t adequately addressing these days is rogue code infecting their employees’ mobile phones — or worse, their corporate networks.

Share

Tags: , , , , , ,

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Neutralizing the Smartphone Security Threat

Neutralizing the Smartphone Security Threat


There are many common, but inaccurate, assumptions about the security and privacy of smartphones and other handheld converged devices. For many corporate employees today, mobile phones and PDAs have replaced PCs. Enterprise workers are now performing the same functions they previously carried out on their desktop PCs on much smaller devices, virtually anywhere and anytime. One of the hidden dangers most CSOs and CIOs aren’t adequately addressing these days is rogue code infecting their employees’ mobile phones — or worse, their corporate networks.

Share

Tags: , , , , , ,

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Neutralizing the Smartphone Security Threat