privacy

The "Hidden" Cost Of Privacy

Schneier points out an article from a while back in Forbes about the “hidden” cost of privacy and how expensive it can be to comply with all the various overlapping privacy laws that don’t necessarily improve anyone’s privacy. “What this all means is that protecting individual privacy remains an externality for many companies, and that basic market dynamics won’t work to solve the problem. Because the efficient market solution won’t work, we’re left with inefficient regulatory solutions. So now the question becomes: how do we make regulation as efficient as possible?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: ,

Monday, June 15th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The "Hidden" Cost Of Privacy

Administration Wants To Scale Back Real ID Law

The Washington Post is running a story on the Obama Administration’s attempt to get a scaled-back version of Bush’s Real ID program passed and implemented. We’ve been discussing the Real ID program from its earliest days up through the states’ resistance to its “unfunded mandate.” “Yielding to a rebellion by states that refused to pay for it, the Obama administration is moving to scale back a federal law passed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks that was designed to tighten security requirements for driver’s licenses… Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano wants to repeal and replace the controversial, billion domestic security initiative known as Real ID… The new proposal, called Pass ID, would be cheaper, less rigorous, and partly funded by federal grants, according to draft legislation that Napolitano’s Senate allies plan to introduce as early as tomorrow. …the Bush administration struggled to implement the 2005 [Real ID] law, delaying the program repeatedly as states called it an unfunded mandate and privacy advocates warned it would create a de facto national ID.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , , , ,

Monday, June 15th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Administration Wants To Scale Back Real ID Law

How Should a Constitution Protect Digital Rights?

Bibek Paudel writes “Nepal’s Constituent Assembly is drafting a new constitution for the country. We (FOSS Nepal) are interacting with various committees of the Assembly regarding the issues to be included in the new constitution. In particular, the ‘Fundamental Rights Determination Committee’ is seeking our suggestions in the form of a written document so that they can discuss it in their meeting next week. We have informed them, informally, of our concerns for addressing digital liberties and ensuring them as fundamental rights in the constitution. We’d also like to see the right to privacy, anonymity and access public information regardless of the technology (platforms/software). Whether or not our suggestions will be incorporated depends on public hearings and voting in the assembly later, but the document we submit will be archived for use as reference material in the future when amendments in the constitution will be discussed or new laws will be prepared. How are online rights handled in your country? How would you want to change it?” Read on for more about Bibek’s situation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , ,

Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on How Should a Constitution Protect Digital Rights?

NSA Ill-Suited For Domestic Cybersecurity Role

Hugh Pickens writes “Former CIA counterterrorism analyst Stephen Lee has an interesting article in the Examiner asserting that the National Security Agency is ‘a secretive, hidebound culture incapable of keeping up with innovation,’ with a history of disregard for privacy and civil liberties. Lee says that for most of its sixty-year history, the NSA has been geared to cracking telecom and crypto gear produced by Soviet and Chinese design bureaus, but at the end of the cold war became ‘stymied by new-generation Western-engineered telephone networks and mobile technologies that were then spreading like wildfire in the developing world and former Soviet satellite countries.’ When the NSA finally recognized that it needed to get better at innovation, it launched several mega-projects, tagged like ‘Trailblazer’ and ‘Groundbreaker,’ that have been spectacular failures, costing US taxpayers billions. More recently, the NY Times reported that the NSA has been breaking rules set by the Obama administration to peer even more aggressively into American citizens’ phone traffic and email inboxes. Whistleblower reports portray NSA domestic eavesdropping programs as unprofessional and poorly supervised, with intercept technicians ridiculing and mishandling recordings of citizens’ private ‘pillow talk’ conversations. Lee concludes that ‘if the Federal government must play a role, then Congress and President Obama should turn to another agency without a record of creating mistrust — perhaps even a new entity. Meanwhile, NSA should focus on listening in on America’s enemies, instead of being an enemy of Americans and their enterprises.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on NSA Ill-Suited For Domestic Cybersecurity Role

How Should a Constitution Protect Digital Rights?

Bibek Paudel writes “Nepal’s Constituent Assembly is drafting a new constitution for the country. We (FOSS Nepal) are interacting with various committees of the Assembly regarding the issues to be included in the new constitution. In particular, the ‘Fundamental Rights Determination Committee’ is seeking our suggestions in the form of a written document so that they can discuss it in their meeting next week. We have informed them, informally, of our concerns for addressing digital liberties and ensuring them as fundamental rights in the constitution. We’d also like to see the right to privacy, anonymity and access public information regardless of the technology (platforms/software). Whether or not our suggestions will be incorporated depends on public hearings and voting in the assembly later, but the document we submit will be archived for use as reference material in the future when amendments in the constitution will be discussed or new laws will be prepared. How are online rights handled in your country? How would you want to change it?” Read on for more about Bibek’s situation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , ,

Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on How Should a Constitution Protect Digital Rights?

How Should a Constitution Protect Digital Rights?

Bibek Paudel writes “Nepal’s Constituent Assembly is drafting a new constitution for the country. We (FOSS Nepal) are interacting with various committees of the Assembly regarding the issues to be included in the new constitution. In particular, the ‘Fundamental Rights Determination Committee’ is seeking our suggestions in the form of a written document so that they can discuss it in their meeting next week. We have informed them, informally, of our concerns for addressing digital liberties and ensuring them as fundamental rights in the constitution. We’d also like to see the right to privacy, anonymity and access public information regardless of the technology (platforms/software). Whether or not our suggestions will be incorporated depends on public hearings and voting in the assembly later, but the document we submit will be archived for use as reference material in the future when amendments in the constitution will be discussed or new laws will be prepared. How are online rights handled in your country? How would you want to change it?” Read on for more about Bibek’s situation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , ,

Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on How Should a Constitution Protect Digital Rights?

NSA Ill-Suited For Domestic Cybersecurity Role

Hugh Pickens writes “Former CIA counterterrorism analyst Stephen Lee has an interesting article in the Examiner asserting that the National Security Agency is ‘a secretive, hidebound culture incapable of keeping up with innovation,’ with a history of disregard for privacy and civil liberties. Lee says that for most of its sixty-year history, the NSA has been geared to cracking telecom and crypto gear produced by Soviet and Chinese design bureaus, but at the end of the cold war became ‘stymied by new-generation Western-engineered telephone networks and mobile technologies that were then spreading like wildfire in the developing world and former Soviet satellite countries.’ When the NSA finally recognized that it needed to get better at innovation, it launched several mega-projects, tagged like ‘Trailblazer’ and ‘Groundbreaker,’ that have been spectacular failures, costing US taxpayers billions. More recently, the NY Times reported that the NSA has been breaking rules set by the Obama administration to peer even more aggressively into American citizens’ phone traffic and email inboxes. Whistleblower reports portray NSA domestic eavesdropping programs as unprofessional and poorly supervised, with intercept technicians ridiculing and mishandling recordings of citizens’ private ‘pillow talk’ conversations. Lee concludes that ‘if the Federal government must play a role, then Congress and President Obama should turn to another agency without a record of creating mistrust — perhaps even a new entity. Meanwhile, NSA should focus on listening in on America’s enemies, instead of being an enemy of Americans and their enterprises.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on NSA Ill-Suited For Domestic Cybersecurity Role

NSA Ill-Suited For Domestic Cybersecurity Role

Hugh Pickens writes “Former CIA counterterrorism analyst Stephen Lee has an interesting article in the Examiner asserting that the National Security Agency is ‘a secretive, hidebound culture incapable of keeping up with innovation,’ with a history of disregard for privacy and civil liberties. Lee says that for most of its sixty-year history, the NSA has been geared to cracking telecom and crypto gear produced by Soviet and Chinese design bureaus, but at the end of the cold war became ‘stymied by new-generation Western-engineered telephone networks and mobile technologies that were then spreading like wildfire in the developing world and former Soviet satellite countries.’ When the NSA finally recognized that it needed to get better at innovation, it launched several mega-projects, tagged like ‘Trailblazer’ and ‘Groundbreaker,’ that have been spectacular failures, costing US taxpayers billions. More recently, the NY Times reported that the NSA has been breaking rules set by the Obama administration to peer even more aggressively into American citizens’ phone traffic and email inboxes. Whistleblower reports portray NSA domestic eavesdropping programs as unprofessional and poorly supervised, with intercept technicians ridiculing and mishandling recordings of citizens’ private ‘pillow talk’ conversations. Lee concludes that ‘if the Federal government must play a role, then Congress and President Obama should turn to another agency without a record of creating mistrust — perhaps even a new entity. Meanwhile, NSA should focus on listening in on America’s enemies, instead of being an enemy of Americans and their enterprises.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, June 12th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on NSA Ill-Suited For Domestic Cybersecurity Role

Firefox 3.5 for 35 days dreaming about the future of the web

Over the next 35 days we’ll be talking about all of the new developer features in Firefox 3.5. The upcoming release of Firefox 3.5 is a big upgrade for users. It includes new privacy features, improvements in interactive performance and a new JavaScript engine that will improve the experience for users using script-heavy web sites.

Share

Tags: , , ,

Tuesday, June 9th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Firefox 3.5 for 35 days dreaming about the future of the web

War on Piracy More Important Than Right To Privacy

A Swiss court has ruled that an anti-piracy tracking company can continue monitoring the public on the Internet. The court said that the need to fight illicit file-sharers outweighs the need to protect an individual’s privacy on the Internet, and that the ends justified the means.

Share

Tags: ,

Friday, June 5th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on War on Piracy More Important Than Right To Privacy