programming

Student Who Released Code From Assignments Accused of Cheating

Death Metal sends in a story about Kyle Brady, a computer science major at San Jose State University, who recently ran into trouble over publishing the source code to his programming assignments after their due dates. One of Brady’s professors contacted him and threatened to fail him if he did not take down the code. Brady took the matter to the Computer Science Department Chair, who consulted with others and decided that releasing the code was not an ethical violation. Quoting Cory Doctorow at Boing Boing: “There’s a lot of meat on the bones of this story. The most important lesson from it for me is that students want to produce meaningful output from their course-assignments, things that have intrinsic value apart from their usefulness for assessing their progress in the course. Profs — including me, at times — fall into the lazy trap of wanting to assign rotework that can be endlessly recycled as work for new students, a model that fails when the students treat their work as useful in and of itself and therefore worthy of making public for their peers and other interested parties who find them through search results, links, etc. But the convenience of profs must be secondary to the pedagogical value of the university experience — especially now, with universities ratcheting up their tuition fees and trying to justify an education that can put students into debt for the majority of their working lives.”

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Saturday, June 13th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Student Who Released Code From Assignments Accused of Cheating

Should Undergraduates Be Taught Fortran?

Mike Croucher writes “Despite the fact that it is over 40 years old, Fortran is still taught at many Universities to students of Physics, Chemistry, Engineering and more as their first ever formal introduction to programming. According to this article that shouldn’t be happening anymore, since there are much better alternatives, such as Python, that would serve a physical science undergraduate much better. There may come a time in some researchers’ lives where they need Fortran, but this time isn’t in ‘programming for chemists 101.’ What do people in the Slashdot community think?”

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Thursday, June 11th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Should Undergraduates Be Taught Fortran?

New Languages vs. Old For Parallel Programming

joabj writes “Getting the most from multicore processors is becoming an increasingly difficult task for programmers. DARPA has commissioned a number of new programming languages, notably X10 and Chapel, written especially for developing programs that can be run across multiple processors, though others see them as too much of a departure to ever gain widespread usage among coders.”

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Sunday, June 7th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on New Languages vs. Old For Parallel Programming

Microsoft Files For 3 Parallel Processing Patents

theodp writes “M|cr0s0ft may have been a Johnny-come-lately when it comes to parallel programming, but that’s not stopping the software giant from trying to patent it. This week, the USPTO revealed that M|cr0s0ft has three additional parallel-processing patents pending — 1. Partitioning and Repartitioning for Data Parallel Operations, 2. Data Parallel Searching, and 3. Data Parallel Production and Consumption. Informing the USPTO that ‘Software programs have been written to run sequentially since the beginning days of software development,’ M|cr0s0ft adds there’s been a ‘[recent] shift away from sequential execution toward parallel execution.’ Before they grant the patents, let’s hope the USPTO gets a second opinion on the novelty of M|cr0s0ft’s parallel-processing patent claims.”

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Sunday, June 7th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Microsoft Files For 3 Parallel Processing Patents

Microsoft Files For 3 Parallel Processing Patents

theodp writes “M|cr0s0ft may have been a Johnny-come-lately when it comes to parallel programming, but that’s not stopping the software giant from trying to patent it. This week, the USPTO revealed that M|cr0s0ft has three additional parallel-processing patents pending — 1. Partitioning and Repartitioning for Data Parallel Operations, 2. Data Parallel Searching, and 3. Data Parallel Production and Consumption. Informing the USPTO that ‘Software programs have been written to run sequentially since the beginning days of software development,’ M|cr0s0ft adds there’s been a ‘[recent] shift away from sequential execution toward parallel execution.’ Before they grant the patents, let’s hope the USPTO gets a second opinion on the novelty of M|cr0s0ft’s parallel-processing patent claims.”

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Sunday, June 7th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Microsoft Files For 3 Parallel Processing Patents

Microsoft Files For 3 Parallel Processing Patents

theodp writes “M|cr0s0ft may have been a Johnny-come-lately when it comes to parallel programming, but that’s not stopping the software giant from trying to patent it. This week, the USPTO revealed that M|cr0s0ft has three additional parallel-processing patents pending — 1. Partitioning and Repartitioning for Data Parallel Operations, 2. Data Parallel Searching, and 3. Data Parallel Production and Consumption. Informing the USPTO that ‘Software programs have been written to run sequentially since the beginning days of software development,’ M|cr0s0ft adds there’s been a ‘[recent] shift away from sequential execution toward parallel execution.’ Before they grant the patents, let’s hope the USPTO gets a second opinion on the novelty of M|cr0s0ft’s parallel-processing patent claims.”

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Sunday, June 7th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Microsoft Files For 3 Parallel Processing Patents

First Look At Visual Studio 2010 Beta 1

snydeq writes “InfoWorld’s Martin Heller takes VS2010 Beta 1 for a test drive and finds the upgrade promising, particularly with regard to improved thread debugging and a revamped UI. But the biggest enhancements have to do with parallel programming, Heller writes. ‘I’m not sure that I’ve completely grasped the power of the new .Net Framework and native C++ support for task and data parallelism in VS2010, but what I’ve seen so far is impressive.’ Heller points to intriguing parallel programming samples posted to CodePlex and offers numerous screenshots of VS2010 Beta 1 functionality. He also notes that the beta still lacks support for ASP.Net MVC, smart devices, and the .Net Micro Framework.”

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Friday, June 5th, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on First Look At Visual Studio 2010 Beta 1

The speed, size and dependability of programming languages

72 programming languages plotted on graphs against speed and code size. These were collated using the 19 benchmarks of the ‘Computer Language Benchmarks Game’ which consists of 1368 programs

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Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on The speed, size and dependability of programming languages

Adobe gives Flash a programming boost

New betas of Flash Builder 4, Flash Catalyst, and Flash’s open-source Flex underpinnings give Adobe a better response to Web apps and M|cr0s0ft’s Silverlight.

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Monday, June 1st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Adobe gives Flash a programming boost

Comparing the Size, Speed, and Dependability of Programming Languages

In this blog post, the author plots the results of 19 different benchmark tests across 72 programming languages to create a quantitative comparison between them. The resulting visualizations give insight into how the languages perform across a variety of tasks, and also how some some languages perform in relation to others. “If you drew the benchmark results on an XY chart you could name the four corners. The fast but verbose languages would cluster at the top left. Let’s call them system languages. The elegantly concise but sluggish languages would cluster at the bottom right. Let’s call them script languages. On the top right you would find the obsolete languages. That is, languages which have since been outclassed by newer languages, unless they offer some quirky attraction that is not captured by the data here. And finally, in the bottom left corner you would find probably nothing, since this is the space of the ideal language, the one which is at the same time fast and short and a joy to use.”

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Sunday, May 31st, 2009 Uncategorized Comments Off on Comparing the Size, Speed, and Dependability of Programming Languages